x
In response to Elles: Women Artists from the Centre Pompidou, Paris, we encourage you to share thoughts, memories, images or video of women who have inspired you. Tell us about the positive impact a woman has made on your life. Here are some ideas to get you started: view sample questions

Submit your story, image, or video >

Currently text submissions in Internet Explorer do not work. All other media submissions work in IE.
This photo was taken in NYC around 1914, when my mother, Martha Behrman Weisman, (the seated baby with brown hair) was about one year old.  Martha gave me life, but it was the standing blonde little girl, just about two years older than Martha, my Aunt Dena Behrman Bengal who finished the job of mothering me when Martha died at a young age.  Pictured on the right is my grandmother, their mother, Sara Diamond Behrman, who came to this country from Poland in the late 19th century and was quickly orphaned.  After a few years in the Hebrew Orphan Asylum in NYC’s lower East side, she became a secretary and helped all five younger siblings find jobs, become independent and adapt to this new land.  On the left is Molly Diamond,  her youngest sibling, my Grand Aunt, who lived in the ancestral homestead in Brooklyn with Sara as elders.  Molly always slipped me $50 on the sly when no one else was looking and I was a student at Barnard, and then later when I lived as an NYC bohemian.  Family legend has it that Molly (who never married) enjoyed both the company of men and women in myriad ways.  All four of these women and girls inspired me by their great strength, daring and style, along with their capacity to adapt, endure, care for one another,  and by their profound love for me.

This photo was taken in NYC around 1914, when my mother, Martha Behrman Weisman, (the seated baby with brown hair) was about one year old.  Martha gave me life, but it was the standing blonde little girl, just about two years older than Martha, my Aunt Dena Behrman Bengal who finished the job of mothering me when Martha died at a young age.  Pictured on the right is my grandmother, their mother, Sara Diamond Behrman, who came to this country from Poland in the late 19th century and was quickly orphaned.  After a few years in the Hebrew Orphan Asylum in NYC’s lower East side, she became a secretary and helped all five younger siblings find jobs, become independent and adapt to this new land.  On the left is Molly Diamond,  her youngest sibling, my Grand Aunt, who lived in the ancestral homestead in Brooklyn with Sara as elders.  Molly always slipped me $50 on the sly when no one else was looking and I was a student at Barnard, and then later when I lived as an NYC bohemian.  Family legend has it that Molly (who never married) enjoyed both the company of men and women in myriad ways.  All four of these women and girls inspired me by their great strength, daring and style, along with their capacity to adapt, endure, care for one another,  and by their profound love for me.

— 1 year ago with 1 note